The Purge

The purge has a nice set up for what is essentially a home invasion film. Set in an alternative future  where america has sets a side 12 hours of every year for crime is illegal. That mean it’s perfectly alright to kill your boss or your neighbour who you hate all year round and nothing will become of it. It’s an odd ball theory that is explained as  purely releasing the beast.  Ethan Hawke plays a home sacristy sales man who has done well in life due to the annual purge but when his son lets in a stranger asking for help outside, it attracts attention from the wrong crowd outside who want kill the man who is hiding in their own home. There are things to like about The Purge as it was straight up violent B-Movie with a different twist to a premise we’ve all seen before. It also has ideas as well. How would society act if such a thing existed. Would it turn us all in psychopaths if we know there would be any repercussions.

 

It’s a fun tense ride with plenty of hard edge violence to keep you distracted from the weakness of its own convictions.  By the time the story reaches its climax, it all starts to fall apart as it attempts to put too many ideas and views across that over egg the pudding. While sticking in confounds of a disposable 85 minute thriller, it aspires to be something it’s not and trips up by not being sure what  exactly it has to say. While watching Hawke is decent  of a strict business type who is all for the event but stays locked up in his house as Rhys Wakefield is perfectly creepy as the nameless leader of preppy rich kids wanting to extract violence for their own sick pleasures. While entertaining on while watching it fades the memory fairly quickly. However due the 3 million budget and the runaway success at the box office, a sequel is more than likely on its way..

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